Roman Temple

The graceful Templo Romano stands at the very heart of the old city of Evora. Dating from the second century AD, it is the best-preserved temple in Portugal, despite its use as an execution-ground during the Inquisition and a slaughterhouse until 1870.

The remains consist of a small platform supporting fourteen granite columns with Corinthian capitals and a marble entablature.

Its popular attribution to Diana is apparently fanciful; Jupiter is the more likely alternative.

The temple is part of the historical centre of the city, classified a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. It is one of the most famous landmarks of √Čvora and a symbol of Roman presence in Portuguese territory.